News
  1. Made In Joburg

    Housing in Southern Africa

    01 March 2014

    Take a trip over Joburg’s iconic Nelson Mandela Bridge from the Braamfontein side and enter into Joburg’s arty precinct, Newtown. It has all the ethos of a cosmopolitan capital – theatres, trendy squares, vibe markets and unique accommodation. One of the newest projects, Mill Junction, has attracted interest from varsity students and acclaim from the property media.

    Please click here to download the full article

    One of the newest projects, Mill Junction, has attracted interest from varsity students and acclaim from the property media.

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  2. Joburg’s ‘Jenga’ building stacks shipping containers on old mill

    CNN

    24th February 2014

    By Eoghan Macguire, for CNN
    A developer in the South African city of Johannesburg has transformed an old grain silo into trendy residences, re-purposing the entire ten-story building and topping it with disused shipping containers to provide extra living space.

    The result may look like a giant Jenga puzzle, but the Mill Junction project aims to provide affordable accommodation to just under 400 students.

    South African universities have high dropout rates, according to figures from the country’s Council on Higher Education, with many students forced to quit their studies before graduating.

    According to Citiq, the company behind the project, Mill Junction will help students from poorer backgrounds by offering them budget living space close to school campuses. The building has been fitted with communal kitchens, study areas, free WiFi and a rooftop social area.

    “Our intention with these projects is to provide people with decent accommodation at affordable prices that is well located centrally in the city,” Citiq CEO, Paul Lapham, told CNN.

    “I am really excited about how these kind of projects can help address the dire shortage of good student accommodation in South Africa,” he added.

    As well as providing an important social function, Lapham believes the project has helped maintain the architectural heritage of Johannesburg.

    The distinctive grain silos had lain dormant since the late 1980s but provide a striking visual reminder of the old industries once housed in the city.

    Adding shipping containers, meanwhile, has put an extra five levels on the original structure (including the rooftop space) and makes creative second use of materials that would otherwise lie idle.

    See also: Could micro-homes offer big housing solution

    “Repurposing old spaces plays a key role in revitalizing a city in terms of the people living and working there, as well as retaining the history, character and eclectic feel of these old neighborhoods,” Lapham said.

    “The alternative of leaving these sites abandoned, or even demolishing them, has the potential to destroy this.”

    Click here to read the full article

    A developer in the South African city of Johannesburg has transformed an old grain silo into trendy residences.

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  3. Developers think outside the box

    eNCA

    15 Feb 2014

    To watch the eNCA interview, click here

    This week, silos that were once used to store grain were unveiled as new student accommodation in Jozi’s cultural hub of Newtown.

    “When you work in Johannesburg — in the existing part, where you have old buildings — you actually have to be creative to make use of the spaces, ” Developer, Paul Lapham told eNCA.

    “So for us it’s clearly better to keep a part of Joburg’s history, like the silos, and keep them and use them for the people that are living here today,” he said.

    The project has repurposed 10 grain silos topped with shipping containers as accommodation / living space for up to 375 students.

    The building is eco-friendly too, with motion-sensor lighting, double-glazed windows and insulated water pipes.

    “If you look around you at the background and at the views and so on that are available it really is a wonderful site. It would be a terrible loss to demolish a building and not use for something else,” Lapham enthused.

    The R40-million development has proved popular so far.

    Mill Junction is just one development where buildings are being re-modelled to serve a new purpose, altering Johannesburg’s architecture as the city grows and changes.

    This week, silos that were once used to store grain were unveiled as new student accommodation in Jozi’s cultural hub of Newtown.

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  4. silo stacked container apartments overlook jhb

    Designboom

    10 Feb 2014

    by Designboom

    addressing the shortage of student accommodation within johannesburg, property developers citiq has converted the city’s unused grain silos into affordable student accommodation. ‘mill junction’ comprises 375 individual apartments, in addition to a host of study facilities, libraries, lounges and computer rooms. in order to provide additional floor space, a series of stacked shipping containers encompass the 11-storey silos, providing a vibrant and colorful addition the city’s skyline. climbing to a height of nearly forty meters, the scheme towers above neighboring buildings – offering panoramic views across the surrounding landscape. construction on-site was completed in january 2014, with the building set to open in its doors to new students the following february.

    To Read the full article on Designboom click here

    LAddressing the shortage of student accommodation within johannesburg.

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  5. Jozi container living is energy-efficient

    The Citizen

    13 Feb 2014

    by JeVanne Gibbs, The Citizen

    It was by default that the silo-container student accommodation structure in Newtown, Johannesburg became a “green” energy-efficient building.

    Speaking at the official opening of the building yesterday, Citiq property development group CEO Paul Lapham said a number of little features added to the building made it economically green.

    “Apart from the contemporary design and the reuse of the existing silo structure, the apartments have energy-efficient features such as hot water from heat pumps, motion-sensor lighting, double glazing on windows and external doors, energy-efficient lighting and water-pipe insulation,” said Lapham.

    “These initiatives have cut power consumption on the project to 50% of that used by a conventional building, and will have long-term savings for students living there.”

    Construction of the first set of silos featuring shipping containers to the west of the M1 highway in Newtown was completed in January, following a year-long construction process.

    The group had acquired the grain silos, estimated to be about 50 years old, between 2007 and 2008 at a cost of R4 million. The total building cost (i.e. improvements) was about R30 million.

    University of Johannesburg law student Tsietsi Rahlao said he chose the unique building for accommodation for its “amazing” view, after considering a number of other student lodgings.

    “I’m from Lakeside in Orage Farm in the south of Joburg, and find living in a container to be pretty normal. It’s very comfortable, I like it,” he said of his single room on the fourteenth floor.

    Johannesburg saw its first shipping container multi-storey building dubbed Sixty One on Countesses open in Windsor East two years ago.

    The development consisted of 20 shipping containers and boasts 15 units.

    Consultations with residents in Melville are continuing following the announcement of plans to construct a unique retail space in the area using shipping containers.

    The proposed development is intended for the Faan Smit Park and will combine green space with retail. Tenants at the site would include artists, designers and retailers of niche products.

    Click here to read the full article

    It was by default that the silo-container student accommodation structure in Newtown, became a “green” building.

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  6. Students get run of mill

    by Yolisa Mkele, The Times

    Silos Previously used for storing grain were unveiled yesterday as a student accommodation complex in Newtown, Johannesburg. Dubbed Mill Junction, the development features 10 old grain silos topped with shipping containers that can house up to to 375 students.

    To read the full article, click here to download.

    The Times, 13 Feb 2014 —- Silos Previously used for storing grain were unveiled yesterday as a student accommodation complex in Newtown, Johannesburg.

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  7. Students scramble for Accommodation

    With Accommodation already in short supply, universities are hard pressed to meet demand. In 2010, it was estimated that that universities needed to provide accommodation for nearly 50% of registered students (277,000 beds) whereas the actual number available was 20.1% (108,000 beds). Private property investors help to meet much of this shortfall in accommodation through privately run student residences.

    Download the full article from the Sunday Times here

    With Accommodation already in short supply, universities are hard pressed to meet demand. In 2010, it was estimated that that universities needed to provide accommodation for nearly 50% of registered students (277,000 beds) whereas the actual number available was 20.1% (108,000 beds). Private property investors help to meet much of this shortfall in accommodation through […] Read More

  8. CITIQ CHALLENGES CONVENTIONAL CONSTRUCTION METHODS

    Braamfontein 06 January 2014
    Citiq, a Gauteng based property investment and management company, is challenging conventional views of residential accommodation with developments such as the shipping container apartment block in Windsor and now student accommodation in the refurbished grain silos.

    Most new residential developments involve urban sprawl, where affordable accommodation is built on the periphery of the city, resulting in people becoming increasingly marginalized. Citiq is providing convenient accommodation by reusing land and buildings that are located in prime locations in the City.

    CEO of Citiq, Paul Lapham has a different view of the possibilities embodied in a neglected office block, vacant stand or former industrial buildings. “Reusing these structures often provides for an artistic and eclectic look and feel, which appeals to people wanting to establish their own individuality. This alternative development approach, as compared to traditional building methods involving bricks and mortar, has guided our more recent property acquisitions and designs,” he says.

    “The first alternative development was the apartment block built out of shipping containers in Windsor, Johannesburg. We were initially quite nervous about how the public would react to living in an apartment built out of shipping containers. But as it turns out, all the apartments were let within two days of our open day. This opened our eyes to the pent-up demand that exists for good accommodation irrespective of the building methods involved.”

    Another student development currently underway is the Mill Junction, which involves the conversion of the former Premier Milling grain silos into trendy student apartments. The conversion involves the cutting out of windows and inclusion of slabs to make floors, and will provide accommodation to over 300 students in circular rooms with fantastic views of the city.

    Mill Junction will include standard facilities such as free wifi, study and recreation rooms, as well as communal kitchens. The development will be completed in time for the 2014 student intake in February.

    The student community plays an important role in providing a rewarding living experience to our students. Large scale student residences, or student villages, enable people to mix with likeminded individuals, study together and confront the challenge of their futures together. Put simply, in a village everyone can share in common goals and aspirations.

    “We are currently looking at a number of other buildings that we believe can be converted into great student accommodation or residential apartments. One being the grand silos, also in Newtown. While we particularly like Newtown precinct at the moment, we are looking at projects in a number of other areas as well,” says Lapham.

    Citiq, a Gauteng based property investment and management company, is challenging conventional views of residential accommodation with developments such as the shipping container apartment block in Windsor and now student accommodation in the refurbished grain silos.

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  9. ARCHITECTURAL STUDENTS’ HAVE INPUT IN THE SILO’S DESIGNS

    Braamfontein 03 November, 2013
    Property investment and management company, Citiq has launched a competition aimed at registered architectural students, featuring creative concepts for the conversion of the large Newtown Silos into student accommodation. The aim is to give architectural students an opportunity to design a space that will not only redefine student life, but also student lifestyle.

    The designs for the repurposing of the large Newtown Silos follow two other recent silo projects in South Africa. The silos at the Biscuit Mill in Cape Town were converted to space for the Cape Town Creative Academy with a restaurant on the rooftop. Meanwhile Citiq is also responsible for the conversion of the smaller Newtown Silos to student accommodation, with construction planned to be completed in January 2014.

    “Our intention behind the compeition is to stimulate debate and interest in the enormous potential represented by the large Newtown Silos as student apartments. Given that this space is intended exclusively for students, we want architectural students to feel part of the transformation of Newtown and interpret, through their designs, a fun and trendy space that epitomises varsity life. We are looking for the most innovative concepts and artistic interpretations of these concrete pipes,” says CEO Paul Lapham.

    The architectural departments at the University of Johannesburg and the University of the Witwatersrand as well as the Gauteng Institute for Architects have added their support and will form part of the judges’ panel along with Paul Lapham and Arthur Blake who is the inspiration behind the Mill Junction silo development.

    Judging will take place on 14 February, 2014 and the finalists’ works will be on display at the Ithuba Arts Gallery at the Ithuba Arts Gallery, Anchor House, 100 Juta Street, Braamfontein, from 17 – 21 February. The overall winner will be awarded R35 000 and second and third places will receive R17 500 and R7 500, respectively. Entries opened on 22 November 2013 and will close on 24 January 2014.

    The exhibition will display the most outstanding designs to which architectural firms and designers will be invited to attend.

    For information about the competition, visit the Facebook page – Grand Silos at Newtown.

    Property investment and management company, Citiq has launched a competition aimed at registered architectural students, featuring creative concepts for the conversion of the large Newtown Silos into student accommodation.

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  10. CITIQ CITY INDEX 2012

    CITIQ CITY INDEX SHOWS GROWTH IN THE INNER CITY

    Contact: Lesley-Ann van Niftrik, Image Communications, Cell: 083 378 2902,
    On behalf of: Paul Lapham, CEO , Citiq. Office: 0860 109-237.
    Mobile 083 289 9302
    Razia Cleland, senior analyst Citiq. Mobile 071 481 3937


    Braamfontein, 25 April, 2013
    According to the latest Johannesburg City Index conducted by Citiq, affordable apartments in both the inner city and outlying townhouse areas have delivered solid investment performance over the past 12 years. An inner city apartment purchased in 2000 would have delivered capital appreciation of 11.5% per annum over the past 12 years. Over the same period, a similar townhouse would have generated capital returns of 10.5% per annum.


    “This reinforces our view that property, particularly at the entry level where first time home owners are operating, remains a great longer term investment. It also gives buyers the opportunity to grow capital and wealth over time, as well as providing them with a place to stay,” says Paul Lapham, CEO of Citiq, a Johannesburg investment and property management company which owns and manages in excess of 4,000 apartments spread across the city.


    Historically, there has been limited information available to assist the average home buyer in determining the real value of a residential apartment and the appropriate market price. The Johannesburg City Index tracks apartment prices on the basis of rand per square meter, based on actual transactions through the Deeds Office. This gives a benchmark to determine value, and one that can be applied across different suburbs and apartment types.


    The City Index focuses on Johannesburg, and looks at both the inner city apartment market as well as a representative selection of suburbs, where townhouses have been built and occupied during the period studied. The analysis goes back to 2000, which deals with the recovery after the 1999 slump in house prices, as well as the subsequent boom leading up to 2008, and the more recent performance of the housing market up until the end of 2012.

    According to the latest Johannesburg City Index conducted by Citiq, affordable apartments in both the inner city and outlying townhouse areas have delivered solid investment performance over the past 12 years.

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