News
  1. Silo thinking

    House & Leisure 2014

    The conversion of 10 silos in Joburg’s Newtown into 400 units of student housing is a marvel of upcycling and design thinking.

    Please click here to read the full article.

    The conversion of 10 silos in Joburg’s Newtown into 400 units of student housing is a marvel of upcycling and design thinking.

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  2. Melville Shipping Container Shopping Centre Gets Go-ahead

    IOL September 2014

    The new container shopping centre in Melville is set to become a reality after the city approved the site development plan.

    The development, in the Faan Smit Park west of 7th Street, will become South Africa’s first shopping centre made of shipping containers.

    The park will be known as 27boxes. Its design is planned to reflect the vibrant, trendy and somewhat bohemian character that made Melville famous, transforming it into a shopping centre and parkland.

    The development will provide 200 parking bays.

    ‘Affordable shopping space is geared for the needs of small entrepreneurs, artists, creative people and food lovers. We hope 27boxes will provide an ideal environment to attract shoppers and encourage visitors to linger and enjoy what’s on offer from the eclectic mix of tenants,’ said the developer, Citiq chief executive Paul Lapham.

    The shopping centre will have art galleries and studios, a couturier, a bakery, microbrewery, furniture manufacturer, a restaurant, a coffee shop, a boutique garden centre, a children’s playground, and an amphitheatre. The monthly rental on a container shop will be from R1 600. Pop-up shops will be available for periods of as little as a week.

    ‘Shipping containers have long been associated with popup malls and temporary exhibition stands. They have also provided the basic building block for a number of internationally acclaimed retail developments. Box Park in London, and a retail park in Christchurch, New Zealand, are both examples of what can be achieved with the humble shipping container. We look forward to providing residents and tenants with a shopping experience that will spearhead the revival of Melville,’ says Lapham.

    However, not all residents are happy. Aimee Nel says she started a private cleaning company in Melville with contributions from residents and businesses, due to the lack of public services.

    ‘Do Arthur Blake (the developer) and Amanda Forsythe (the ward councillor) have any idea how much noise and filth we have to deal with every day of our lives due to the businesses? We have picked up tons of rubbish and rubble in the streets and there is no end in sight. Main Road and 7th Street look like dumps most of the time. There are homeless heroin addicts sleeping on our streets (whom) we cannot get rid of, as they have more rights these days than us taxpayers.

    ‘People are scared to go out at night as Melville is not safe any more. We have shops standing empty, which is in itself a big problem as it is here where the drug dealers gather the most, such as on the corner of 4th and Main, yet they want to give us more shops?’ she asked.

    Forsythe said the site development plan was considered after extensive discussions and they were satisfied that the applicant addressed all matters raised by the officials. Confirmation was also received from the Johannesburg Roads Agency through its traffic impact study, and the Provincial Heritage Resources Authority of Gauteng, that all processes were complied with and approval was granted.

    ‘All representations made by interested parties and representatives of the community were also considered and meetings were held with these representatives, as well as with the Johannesburg Property Company and Land Use Management on the matter,’ she said.

    The site was rezoned during a process that commenced in 2000 and approval was granted in 2004 after a tribunal hearing during which all objectors were given an opportunity to provide input. Faan Smit is no longer classified as a park.

    It was transferred from City Parks to the JPC in the late 1990s and put out to tender. This followed many complaints from the Melville community.

    Forsythe said members of the community did not use the park. This was one of the main reasons it had been taken over by ‘undesirables’.

    ‘Most of the development will take place on what was once tennis courts. And the green space should, for the most part, remain green space. Plans we have seen include a children’s play area and an open amphitheatre, which could be used for public meetings and concerts,’ she said.

    CityWatch
    The Star

    Click here to read the article on IOL

    The new container shopping centre in Melville is set to become a reality after the city approved the site development plan.

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  3. Iets sinvols uit ‘n leë dop

    Beeld Augustus 2014

    ’n Stedelike vernuwingsprojek in Johannesburg het van ’n leë gebou ’n studentehemel gemaak, skryf Debreé Kluge.

    Newtown in Johannesburg is al geruime tyd ’n gunsteling van argitekte wat in stedelike vernuwing belang stel.Arthur Blake, besturende direkteur van Citiq Property Development, hou al jare die silo’s in Carrstraat met ’n valkoog dop. Die gebou staan al sedert die 1970’s leeg.

    Onlangs is sy droom om dié gebou in studentehuisvesting te omskep, bewaarheid. Daar is plek vir 375 studente en die eerste sowat 200 het hulle reeds tuisgemaak in dié besonderse omgewing. Die uitdaging was om ’n struktuur wat vir die meeste mense na ’n nuttelose dop gelyk het, in iets sinvols te omskep, sê Blake.

    Hy wou ook deel wees van die wêreldwye neiging in stedelike vernuwing om ou geboue in groen geboue te omskep eerder as om hulle plat te slaan en van nuuts af iets te bou.

    “Dis noodsaaklik dat ons bestaande geboue hernuwe sodat mense in die stad kan bly en nie ure van hul tyd in treine of op die pad hoef deur te bring nie,” sê Blake.

    Toe hy met die idee vorendag kom, het Blake se uitvoerende hoof, Paul Lapham, eers ’n bietjie aan sy idee herkou. Later het hy die projek egter heelhartig ondersteun.

    Omdat hulle die gebou so kostedoeltreffend kon bou, kon hulle vir die studente ’n unieke ruimte skep.

    Dié wat aanvanklik skepties was, is veral beïndruk deur die gebou se funksionaliteit. Die vragskeephouer-koshuis het ’n gimnasium, ontspanningsplekke, televisiekamers en twee braaiplekke met seker een van die beste uitsigte oor Johannesburg.

    Binnekort sal die gebou ook ’n klimmuur hê vir die meer avontuurlustige studente.

    “Studente sal die gebou vir die res van hul lewe onthou,” meen Blake.

    Daar is veiligheidspersoneel en toegang tot die gebou word met vingerafdrukskandeerders beheer.

    Drie van die studente wat in Mill Junction woon, was vol lof vir hul nuwe “huis weg van die huis”.

    Lucy Khofi (20), ’n onderwysstudent aan die Universiteit van die Witwatersrand, sê die studente is soos een groot familie en sy is veral opgewonde oor die gratis Wi-Fi en die gimnasium.

    Johannah Ditshego (22) studeer onderwys aan die Universiteit van Johannesburg. “Dit is ’n unieke plek. Ek het al in ander koshuise gebly en was lus vir iets nuuts,” sê sy.

    Benedict Risenga (26), ’n klankingenieurstudent van CityVarsity, sê alles wat hy by die huis sou hê, is by Mill Junction beskikbaar.

    Blake wil nou die silo naby Mill Junction in ’n hotel met konferensiegeriewe en woonstelle omskep.

    Lees die volle artikel op Beeld

    ’n Stedelike vernuwingsprojek in Johannesburg het van ’n leë gebou ’n studentehemel gemaak, skryf Debreé Kluge.

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  4. Mill Junction, innovation in renovation for accommodation

    South African Builder April 2014

    During 2013 the controversial conversion of the former Premier Mill grain silos in Newtown into much needed student accommodation generated considerable interest from the public and professionals alike.

    Please click here to download the full article

    During 2013 the controversial conversion of the former Premier Mill grain silos in Newtown into much needed student accommodation generated considerable interest from the public and professionals alike.

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  5. Made In Joburg

    Housing in Southern Africa
    01 March 2014

    Take a trip over Joburg’s iconic Nelson Mandela Bridge from the Braamfontein side and enter into Joburg’s arty precinct, Newtown. It has all the ethos of a cosmopolitan capital – theatres, trendy squares, vibe markets and unique accommodation. One of the newest projects, Mill Junction, has attracted interest from varsity students and acclaim from the property media.

    Please click here to download the full article

    One of the newest projects, Mill Junction, has attracted interest from varsity students and acclaim from the property media.

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  6. Joburg’s ‘Jenga’ building stacks shipping containers on old mill

    CNN

    24th February 2014

    By Eoghan Macguire, for CNN
    A developer in the South African city of Johannesburg has transformed an old grain silo into trendy residences, re-purposing the entire ten-story building and topping it with disused shipping containers to provide extra living space.

    The result may look like a giant Jenga puzzle, but the Mill Junction project aims to provide affordable accommodation to just under 400 students.

    South African universities have high dropout rates, according to figures from the country’s Council on Higher Education, with many students forced to quit their studies before graduating.

    According to Citiq, the company behind the project, Mill Junction will help students from poorer backgrounds by offering them budget living space close to school campuses. The building has been fitted with communal kitchens, study areas, free WiFi and a rooftop social area.

    “Our intention with these projects is to provide people with decent accommodation at affordable prices that is well located centrally in the city,” Citiq CEO, Paul Lapham, told CNN.

    “I am really excited about how these kind of projects can help address the dire shortage of good student accommodation in South Africa,” he added.

    As well as providing an important social function, Lapham believes the project has helped maintain the architectural heritage of Johannesburg.

    The distinctive grain silos had lain dormant since the late 1980s but provide a striking visual reminder of the old industries once housed in the city.

    Adding shipping containers, meanwhile, has put an extra five levels on the original structure (including the rooftop space) and makes creative second use of materials that would otherwise lie idle.

    See also: Could micro-homes offer big housing solution

    “Repurposing old spaces plays a key role in revitalizing a city in terms of the people living and working there, as well as retaining the history, character and eclectic feel of these old neighborhoods,” Lapham said.

    “The alternative of leaving these sites abandoned, or even demolishing them, has the potential to destroy this.”

    Click here to read the full article

    A developer in the South African city of Johannesburg has transformed an old grain silo into trendy residences.

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  7. Developers think outside the box

    eNCA

    15 Feb 2014

    To watch the eNCA interview, click here

    This week, silos that were once used to store grain were unveiled as new student accommodation in Jozi’s cultural hub of Newtown.

    “When you work in Johannesburg — in the existing part, where you have old buildings — you actually have to be creative to make use of the spaces, ” Developer, Paul Lapham told eNCA.

    “So for us it’s clearly better to keep a part of Joburg’s history, like the silos, and keep them and use them for the people that are living here today,” he said.

    The project has repurposed 10 grain silos topped with shipping containers as accommodation / living space for up to 375 students.

    The building is eco-friendly too, with motion-sensor lighting, double-glazed windows and insulated water pipes.

    “If you look around you at the background and at the views and so on that are available it really is a wonderful site. It would be a terrible loss to demolish a building and not use for something else,” Lapham enthused.

    The R40-million development has proved popular so far.

    Mill Junction is just one development where buildings are being re-modelled to serve a new purpose, altering Johannesburg’s architecture as the city grows and changes.

    This week, silos that were once used to store grain were unveiled as new student accommodation in Jozi’s cultural hub of Newtown.

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  8. silo stacked container apartments overlook jhb

    Designboom

    10 Feb 2014

    by Designboom

    addressing the shortage of student accommodation within johannesburg, property developers citiq has converted the city’s unused grain silos into affordable student accommodation. ‘mill junction’ comprises 375 individual apartments, in addition to a host of study facilities, libraries, lounges and computer rooms. in order to provide additional floor space, a series of stacked shipping containers encompass the 11-storey silos, providing a vibrant and colorful addition the city’s skyline. climbing to a height of nearly forty meters, the scheme towers above neighboring buildings – offering panoramic views across the surrounding landscape. construction on-site was completed in january 2014, with the building set to open in its doors to new students the following february.

    To Read the full article on Designboom click here

    LAddressing the shortage of student accommodation within johannesburg.

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  9. Jozi container living is energy-efficient

    The Citizen

    13 Feb 2014

    by JeVanne Gibbs, The Citizen

    It was by default that the silo-container student accommodation structure in Newtown, Johannesburg became a “green” energy-efficient building.

    Speaking at the official opening of the building yesterday, Citiq property development group CEO Paul Lapham said a number of little features added to the building made it economically green.

    “Apart from the contemporary design and the reuse of the existing silo structure, the apartments have energy-efficient features such as hot water from heat pumps, motion-sensor lighting, double glazing on windows and external doors, energy-efficient lighting and water-pipe insulation,” said Lapham.

    “These initiatives have cut power consumption on the project to 50% of that used by a conventional building, and will have long-term savings for students living there.”

    Construction of the first set of silos featuring shipping containers to the west of the M1 highway in Newtown was completed in January, following a year-long construction process.

    The group had acquired the grain silos, estimated to be about 50 years old, between 2007 and 2008 at a cost of R4 million. The total building cost (i.e. improvements) was about R30 million.

    University of Johannesburg law student Tsietsi Rahlao said he chose the unique building for accommodation for its “amazing” view, after considering a number of other student lodgings.

    “I’m from Lakeside in Orage Farm in the south of Joburg, and find living in a container to be pretty normal. It’s very comfortable, I like it,” he said of his single room on the fourteenth floor.

    Johannesburg saw its first shipping container multi-storey building dubbed Sixty One on Countesses open in Windsor East two years ago.

    The development consisted of 20 shipping containers and boasts 15 units.

    Consultations with residents in Melville are continuing following the announcement of plans to construct a unique retail space in the area using shipping containers.

    The proposed development is intended for the Faan Smit Park and will combine green space with retail. Tenants at the site would include artists, designers and retailers of niche products.

    Click here to read the full article

    It was by default that the silo-container student accommodation structure in Newtown, became a “green” building.

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  10. Students get run of mill

    by Yolisa Mkele, The Times

    Silos Previously used for storing grain were unveiled yesterday as a student accommodation complex in Newtown, Johannesburg. Dubbed Mill Junction, the development features 10 old grain silos topped with shipping containers that can house up to to 375 students.

    To read the full article, click here to download.

    The Times, 13 Feb 2014 —- Silos Previously used for storing grain were unveiled yesterday as a student accommodation complex in Newtown, Johannesburg.

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